The Techno-Tamaladas draw on thousands of years of knowledge and practice cultivating corn/maize across the Americas to sustain life. We invite community members, tinkerers, artists, activists, scientists, eco folks, immigrants, refugees, students, homeless folks, tech workers, city council members, residents and all to sit together, and make and share tamales. We will transfer knowledge about technologies of survival and resurgence of Indigenous, Latinx and African-American communities to instill a more creative technological imaginary. While the broad impacts of technologies of surveillance, social media, racial profiling, militarized policing and effects of displacement and dislocation on low-income communities of color have been devastating, we reorient ideas and practices around technology.

The Techno-Tamaladas transfer knowledge about technologies of survival and resurgence of Indigenous, Latinx and African-American communities to instill a more creative technological imaginary. While the broad impacts of technologies of surveillance, social media, racial profiling, militarized policing and effects of displacement and dislocation on low income communities of color in the Bay Area have been devastating, we reorient ideas and practices around technology.

The Tamaladas focus on MesoAmerican tamales from Mexico; on the Hot Tamales of African American communities of the Mississippi Delta; and on plantain tamales from the Andes in Colombia. The first series of Techno-Tamaladas will be held at ECAP Food Bank, 3610 San Pablo Avenue Emeryville, CA from 11AM – 4PM on Saturday, July 27; Saturday, August 24; Saturday, Sept 21. All the Techno-Tamaladas are free and accessible to folks in wheelchairs.

Stay tuned for dates for the Oakland iteration of the series of Techno-Tamaladas, co-produced with Pro Arts Gallery & COMMONS.

The Techno-Tamaladas is a project created by artist Praba Pilar and coproduced with Pro Arts Gallery & COMMONS. Praba Pilar generated this project at a residency at Grace Performance Space in upstate New York in May 2018. Generous support for this project has been awarded by the City of Emeryville Community Grants Program, the Local Impact Award of the California Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts.